Museo Reina Sofia; Madrid, Spain

Today I visited the Museo Reina Sofia, home to Guernica, the anti-war painting that is perhaps Pablo Picasso's most famous work. Photos of Guernica are not allowed, but I did capture a couple of images of studies created in the preparation of Guernica. Overall, I was underwhelmed by the museum, but that could've easily been the fact that I was overtired, having stayed up all night and having hardly slept at all en route to Spain. Also, it's only fair to note that I made it through only two of the four floors before losing steam. My favorite exhibit was a 20-minute film, "Action at a Distance," by Paloma Polo (2012). It followed a group of dozens of rural laborers who spent what appeared to be the better part of a day and night, moving what appeared to be a large headstone, or some sort of alternative cross. The film faded in and out of focus, with sound that also came and went. It was mesmerizing, or again, that may have just been me being overtired.

Horse's head, study for Guernica.

Horse's head, study for Guernica.

"Dead Birds," by Picasso (1912).

At first glance, I thought this 1925 painting, "Girl at the Window," by Salvador Dalí, was by René Magritte.